Phoebe's Fab 3: Seeing Ceramics

After last week's ceramics post, I wanted to highlight some of my favourite places to visit when I need a good ceramics fix. Though a very humble material, clay has supplied us with so much inspirational work throughout the centuries and it has also supplied us with some of our most loved everyday objects, as well. From Ming Vases to Ikea bowls, these objects all come from the hands and creativity of craftsman and their talent for moulding this material from the earth. 

Victoria and Albert Museum If you're looking for an excuse to visit this iconic museum (and there are many), their internationally unrivalled collection of ceramics may just be the very best one. The ceramics gallery, which was renovated in 2010, is home to a collection that spans centuries, countries and cultures. There is sure to be a piece to please all plate lovers and inspiration aplenty to delight designers and artists alike. 

The Wallace Collection  This wonderful destination is one of my favourite museums in the world, especially as it houses so many Boucher paintings, as well as The Laughing Cavalier by Frans Hols and The Swing by Jean-Honore Fragonard.  Snuggled amongst all these stunners is a fantastic ceramics collection with a special focus on Sevres Porcelain. I can't recommend this hidden gem enough, so head on over the next time you're in London and enjoy everything they have to offer!

Gladstone Pottery Museum Stock-on-Trent is the heart of the English pottery industry and this little museum, located in a Victorian pottery factory, is the epicentre of ceramics. This museum isn't offering a viewing of ceramics, but rather a in-depth look at how they're created. Visit Gladstone to learn what it took to create beautiful ceramics by learning about the working lives of the men, women and children (yes, children!) who worked in the factory and get a first-hand look at the process of producing them. It's a great learning experience for all ages and makes for a very fun family outing! 

Do you have a favourite shop, museum or studio to ogle ceramics? Tell me all about it in the comments below!